Video Tutorial: Open Pinetab (Safely) & Mod To External Antenna Threading (Internal SDR) + LoRa Test

After demonstrating a safer way to open the Pinetab, I install the new part. Before sealing everything off I grinded off a couple milimeter of the block piece (with threading on end). This was to ensure I did not damage my screen internally.

Tell me what you think! If you have any questions leave a comment at the bottom of this page, or in the video.

Thanks for visiting! šŸ™‚

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Pinephone/Pinetab WiFi Monitor Mode Now available (If you hadn’t noticed) And SCAPY Bug Fix

In case you hadn’t noticed WiFi card on the Pinephone/Pinetab in previous Kernels had not supported monitor mode.

It does now.

I found out while testing/writing the mactrack Python script and wanted to write about it. This brings tons of capability for Pinephone users with an interest in ethical pentesting.

I will be doing more tutorials and when an idea comes, putting new material up to share.

SCAPY PYTHON BUG:

For anyone who tried MyACtrack and received the scapy errors, it appears there was a bit of a discrepency between Scapy and Python 3.9.

If you are using Scapy for anything on Python 3.9 and receive the following, keep reading:

Traceback (most recent call last):
Ā  File "/usr/bin/mactrack", line 35, in <module>
Ā Ā Ā  from scapy.all import *
Ā  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.9/dist-packages/scapy/all.py", line 16, in <module>
Ā Ā Ā  from scapy.arch import *
Ā  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.9/dist-packages/scapy/arch/__init__.py", line 27, in <module>
Ā Ā Ā  from scapy.arch.bpf.core import get_if_raw_addr
Ā  File "/usr/local/lib/python3.9/dist-packages/scapy/arch/bpf/core.py", line 30, in <module>
Ā Ā Ā  LIBC = cdll.LoadLibrary(find_library("libc"))
Ā  File "/usr/lib/python3.9/ctypes/util.py", line 341, in find_library
Ā Ā Ā  _get_soname(_findLib_gcc(name)) or _get_soname(_findLib_ld(name))
Ā  File "/usr/lib/python3.9/ctypes/util.py", line 147, in _findLib_gcc
Ā Ā Ā  if not _is_elf(file):
Ā  File "/usr/lib/python3.9/ctypes/util.py", line 99, in _is_elf
Ā Ā Ā  with open(filename, 'br') as thefile:
FileNotFoundError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: b'liblibc.a'

I did a quick edit, and everything worked.

THE FIX:

Edit /usr/local/lib/python3.9/dist-packages/scapy/arch/bpf/core.py
line 30.

Replace “libc” on that line with “c”.

After this Scapy should work for you. šŸ™‚

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MACtrack as Phosh App

Created a package for those running Phosh who would like to install mactrack as an icon/app on their interface/desktop.

WHAT DOES IT DO?

mactrack listens only for devices disconnected from WiFi searching for saved wifi networks. It collects/prints those probes to your screen showing the client mac address/brand name, the RSSI signal strength of each packet, and the saved SSID’s.

After you find clients/SSID’s of interest, you can hit ctrl+c to drop yourself to a SSID location lookup prompt. It utilizes an open source database of mapped out GPS/street addresses for wifi networks around the world.

This can help build/map out a profile on given devices.

Consider this: You have a masked burglar/criminal on your property. You cannot get an accurate description. Hit the mactrack button on Phosh and you have all of the burglars saved network names including his/her home.

Then drop yourself to the SSID search prompt to quickly retrieve the burglar’s home/work address, and other places they frequent (and use WiFi). You have just identified the masked individual.

I created the icon for mactrack myself, and think it turned out rather well:

I used GIMP (www.gimp.org) for the design and illustrated it by hand.

Here are some screenshots (before I added RSSI signal strength):

I talk about it and solutions to this for your own privacy here:

Planning to add more features but for now wanted to upload the basic functionality.

Hope you find this useful. šŸ™‚

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WiFI On? Phone/PC May Be Broadcasting Street Address! Solution Python MACTrack + On Peertube

This is a proof of concept for ethical purposes. It is on hold for the moment.

WHAT DOES IT DO?

Listens for wifi clients (phones, pc’s, tablets) that while disconnected are searching for previously saved network SSID’s (like their home/work); It then directly prints which client mac address is searching for which SSID (seen in screenshot below); It relays the brand name of each client to you on the screen. When you see a client/SSID you are interested in, hit ctrl+c. It then drops you to a search prompt for SSID street address/GPS locations; It logs to a file.

SCREENSHOT:

for the screenshot I hit ctrl+c after 4 probes were seen, I then am dropped to SSID search prompt; When I type in the SSID I receive a list of all known GPS/street address locations; The address returns are all returned to a file for you;

My solutions are also mentioned on video.

SOLUTIONS TO PREVENT SAVED SSID TRACKING: Clear all saved WiFi on your devices. Then create new SSID on your home router. Save this one. It won’t show up in the database! For more confusion save SSID’s that are very far away/unrelated. Use WiPri.

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Tutorial: Adding External Antenna Port To Internal SDR (Pinetab)

I wrote a new tutorial for Pinetab/Pinebook users with an internal SDR on the Pine64 forum. How to add an external threaded antenna port for your internal sdr, with small antennas fitting inside the keyboard stand (LoRa for example). This makes for a super compact SDR kit.

(Working on post formatting ^)

This can be done for any device with internal SDR. In this case, Pinetab. But Pinebooks and any other device can have this extension added in same fashion. Just be careful where you drill the hole.

Adding a way to change out different antennas greatly enhances the usability/options for SDR.

Software defined radio is a really neat thing. Originally these (SDR) tv tuner/satellite chips were primarily used for receiving satellite television. In the last decades or so, these chips were discovered more useful than most originally thought- as a radio receiver for frequencies ranging from the kilohertz – gigahertz ranges.

I did a modification today on my Pinetab and wanted to do a writeup here before recording/editing the later video talk (see below for pic comparisons showing obvious differences before/after).

My Pinetab (Pine64’s Linux Tablet) has an internal SDR, and while under testing it shows all the signs of a working chip, it wasn’t receiving radio quite the way I had hoped.

Sometimes interference can happen when electronic products are too close to your sdr. I considered creating additional shielding, but that didn’t seem to be the problem here. The signal was extremely weak, no matter the frequency/mode. I could not even get a single FM radio station to come in clearly.

This all came down to the antenna. With radio, different antennas have different receiving abilities. More on that later.

There’s not much you can do for SDR to use antennas internally. Sure, it works, but it is highly limited.

I decided it was time to try a modification. I not only wanted to be able to change out the factory antenna, I wanted an easy way to do so via screwing the different antennas onto the threaded end.

I will also be writing a post outlining the process on Pine64 forum, but want to keep a record of my writing here.

The Pinetab optionally carries an internal SDR (Software Defined Radio). This is what I have. And I love it.

So I got to planning. I checked my tools and parts inventory. I noted a LoRa antenna I had laying around (for a LoRa esp32) had a pigtail clip for ESP32. A matching pigtail was fastening the factory included antenna. The LoRa antenna end itself was unscrewable (see it laying at top right), allowing easy interchanging of different antennas. This would be it.

I came up with the idea to cleanly and carefully drill a hole in the back cover (after taken off to be safe of course). I then took one of my antenna cables with the pigtail, and swapped out the factory antenna (see above picture, the factory included antenna I left inside the case, lightly tucked under a ribbon cable; my new antenna end is also seen in this picture attached by the pigtail).

As the picture shows, I used antenna cable with a threaded end, allowing me to interchange/screw on all different types of antennas.

Some antennas are great for LoRa. Other antenna setups are required for receiving live satellite images of the earth. And yet others work well for picking up Ham/Amateur radio operators. And so on.

I proceeded to measure the length of the antenna wire. I made a plan to drill a hole just large enough to fit the threaded end through. The hole placement is key here. I used a marker to carefully plan it. The end result being I have a threaded end coming out of the tablet to attach any antenna setup I choose.

I planned to bolt it to the back cover. See below:

One issue noted was the Pinetab + internal parts did not leave enough room inside for this to work out as smoothing as I had wanted.

I grabbed plyers. I bent the small metal piece on the other side of the threaded end to make it fit without too much trouble. I didn’t want to risk damaging my screen on the other side.

I then used electrical tape to add extra layers of cushioning to the inside of the Pinetab case/wire.

I then set it’s threaded end straight, pulling this threaded end through to come out the outside of the back of Pinetab cover (see picture above/below), to exit out the outside of the tablet. I fastened the small thin bolt + washer over the threaded piece to hold it snug,

Now for the moment of truth… Would the other end fit inside when I attempt to close the case?

I took the newly modified back cover and carefully placed it over the Pinetab. Then I carefully snapped each edge shut, leaving the side closest to the threaded end for last.

I was sure not to put too much pressure on that side, as I didn’t want to chance breaking either my screen or the antenna wire. This is a big reason I wrapped the harder metal parts in electrical tape- to cushion any possible pressure put on inside of my screen.

We’re in. It fits. The case is fully closed.

Small antennas like this (along with antenna cord hooked to larger ones), fit nicely inside the keyboard case stand without any pressure:

I decided to give it a couple pre/post tests to check functionality. Before doing the mod, I took pictures of the signal strengths/waterfall, for comparison. This way I could see if I broke the antenna wire or not.

Another antenna as an example (LoRa):

One nice thing is small antennas like this, along with antenna cord hooked to larger ones, fit nicely inside the keyboard case without any pressure: But, does it work?

I decided to give it a couple tests. Before doing the mod, I took pictures of the signal strengths/waterfall, for comparison. This way I could see if I broke the antenna wire or not.

One of my before/after mod tests was simple FM radio. Why? Because the original antenna couldn’t even pick that up clearly. It only read a weak signal. Static.

My other main test was another stable goto: keyless entry car keys. I used this and took photos before, and after the modification. See for yourself:

Everything is working beautifully. Each antenna picks up/receives uniquely, as they should. Big shout out to Pine64! Awesome Linux hardware.

Now instead of static for everything (including local FM radio) I have voice as clear as an mp3. šŸ™‚

This was fun. Hope it helps you get the confidence needed to do this or other mods on your Pinebook or Pinetab. šŸ™‚ More on this later (in future SDR videos!) Til nexttime!

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Pine64’s Linux Tablet Pinetab (Got SDR?)

In this video we are taking a look at Pine64’s Pinetab. While this video doesn’t yet explore the built in SDR, these are my first impressions on the Pinetab. Big thanks goes out to Pine64 (and awesome community) for this great Linux Tablet device.

After seeing many previous attempts by others at creating a Linux tablet, this one really exceeded my expectations. Pinetab is full of promise, and handles as well as the Pinephone. To find out more, watch the video below.

It’s worth noting there will be unique options for users including backlit magnetic keyboard, even a built in SDR (RTL-SDR)! I’m up and running and will be exploring that internal SDR in future videos. The Pinetab makes an excellent SDR control screen.

Excited to show what we can do with it!

If you have any questions, leave a comment here (or on the video itself).

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Howto: DanctNIX Arch —> Blackarch Portable Pinephone Pentesting Station

Finished a video tutorial for how to turn DanctNIX Arch into a Blackarch Pentesting Pinephone.

We first verify the checksum (for integrity) and install needed keys, making our way to a functional DanctNIX Blackarch

Here is the video:

TIMESTAMPS:

00:00ā€‹ Introduction
00:57ā€‹ Enabling SSH for easy typing into Pinephone from computer
02:26ā€‹ Here we are ssh’d into Pinephone on my laptop
02:49ā€‹ We are starting the process now
06:54ā€‹ Back on the Pinephone to test Blackarch tool running

Commands cut/paste ready (from blackarch.org) for your convenience/reference:

### Installation commands:

Run https://blackarch.org/strap.shā€‹ as root and follow the instructions.
$ curl -O https://blackarch.org/strap.shā€‹

Verifying the SHA1 sum (For integrity):
$ echo d062038042c5f141755ea39dbd615e6ff9e23121 strap.sh | sha1sum -c

Setting executable:
$ chmod +x strap.sh

Run strap.sh:
$ sudo ./strap.sh
$ sudo pacman -Syu

After above use the commands below to build your system how you want!


To list all available tools, run:
$ sudo pacman -Sgg | grep blackarch | cut -d' ' -f2 | sort -u

If you have the space for all tools (over 27,000mb) you can run below command:
$ sudo pacman -S blackarch

To install a category of tools, run:
$ sudo pacman -S blackarch-category

To see the blackarch categories:
$ sudo pacman -Sg | grep blackarch

Note - it maybe be necessary to overwrite certain packages when installing blackarch tools. I suggest going by category if you want to do this safer.

If you experience "failed to commit transaction" errors, use the --needed and --overwrite switches

Example:
$ sudo pacman -Syyu --needed blackarch --overwrite='*'


If you have any questions on the process/possible risks feel free to leave a comment here, or on the video itself.

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More KDE Plasma Pinephone Tests (Manjaro Image), Cellular Internet Fix

Uploaded video demonstrating calls/text messaging working both ways on Manjaro’s KDE Plasma Mobile:

Not included in the video is mention of cellular internet issues. By default the wrong APN is saved, and apparently there is no straightforward way to change the APN (Access Point) for cellular networks..

Temp Solution For Cellular Internet:

I downloaded ModenManager and added my cellular network manually (with known working APN/DNS). After saving this I selected “Activate” in Modem Manager, and suddenly I have my cellular supplied IP address and resolves/pings to google.com were working perfectly (with WiFi disabled for the test).

Unfortunatley this did not stay stable, and lost the connection later on. But if one needs cellular data momentarily, this works.

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Forensics Report On Pinephone (Ubuntu Touch) & Youtube Views

(Thanks to Lukasz for sharing this in the Pine64 chatroom)

One of the really great things standing Odysee out from Youtube is the ability to not only share video, but also files (+earn Lbry coin for views, referrals). I took advantage of this capability to upload this forensics report on Ubuntu Touch Pinephone. While the purpose is to aid criminal investigations, this report reports detailed locations/paths for items that may be of interest to Pinephone owners/tinkerers.

Take a look:

https://odysee.com/@RTP:9/forensic-Pinephone:d